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VGM composers works lists

Ages ago, for the VG Frequency blog, I wrote a series of posts spotlighting some lesser known composers of video game music whose works I greatly enjoy. Each of these posts contained a list of the games they’d composed music for, just as a flat text file.

Since writing those posts, I’ve become really unhappy with those lists. Aside from some inaccuracies, which would be easily fixable, my main problem with them is that they’re inadequately sourced. As a result, there’s no way to tell which games were included because they were 100% confirmed to have music from the composers, and which games were included because a generally reliable site on the internet listed them.

I’ve recently been in contact with someone who’s been corresponding with one of the composers I wrote an article on. The information he’s received from the composer has inspired me to redo those lists, updating the information and overhauling the presentation. So, my site now has a new section, the VGM composers works lists. I’ve only redone the first two of the five so far, and I’m not sure when I’ll get around to the other three, but check it out, and let me know what you think (especially if the pages are broken in your browser, because there’s some JavaScript magic in there).

The content is still basically the same at heart, big ol’ lists of video games, but every game contains a source for its inclusion on the list, and the color coding makes it much easier to differentiate between games with concrete information and the ones with a possibility that the composer wasn’t involved at all. I think these changes make them much more reliable resources than they were before.

Old Mac CDs #3: Fall ’93 Macintosh Promo CD

This installment in the series will be a special one for a couple of reasons. First off, this is not a CD that I or my family originally owned. Unlike the CDs in the previous two installments and the ones I intend to cover in the future, I snagged this one from a college professor who was cleaning out his office.

Second, this is not a CD at all, because the Fall ’93 Macintosh Promo CD (barcode T0592LL/A, catalog number 9140864 on the spine) is actually two CDs (CDAC-043300 and CDRM-1094130).

Walk with me, I’ll explain everything on the way.

Fall '93 Macintosh Promo CD front cover: a way-cool experience for the eyes, ears, and mind.
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Invariant

Last night, I had a problem with Xcode not recognizing a provisioned iPhone. After some fiddling and a screen sharing session, the problem was fixed with a hardware reset to the iPhone.

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Old Mac CDs #2 Gaiden: HyperGlot ICON Resources

This is another followup to the The Macintosh Demo Applications CD Version 1.1 post. It’s the last one, and it’ll be really quick, I promise.

One of the demos, or demo groups, rather, was for HyperGlot Software Company, who made several language-learning applications. I peeked at the ICON resources for the general HyperGlot demo; the demo was written with HyperCard, so these ICONs are used as small images for buttons, like the icon for a pause button. And these images are, well, let’s go with “precious.”

HyperGlot Demo's ICON resources open in ResEdit's resource browser

It would take far too much space and time to explain why each and every one of these icons is a work of art, and really their fabulousness speaks for itself, so I’m going to leave the commentary track to the reader. If you pinned me down and forced me to choose my absolute favorites, they would be 9539, 10191, 11555, 19141, 21021, 23357, and 26905. But they are all equally masterpieces.

Old Mac CDs #2 Gaiden: Finder icon masks

This is an ancillary post to my previous one on The Macintosh Demo Applications CD Version 1.1, based on an observation I made while preparing the icon images for the application list. Before I begin, I need to provide a brief overview of file icons in the classic Mac OS, starting with I believe System 7.

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Old Mac CDs #2: The Macintosh Demo Applications CD Version 1.1

Well, I’ve actually gone ahead and made a second installment, which officially makes “Old Mac CDs” a feature!

This one is another Centris 610 CD: The Macintosh Demo Applications CD Version 1.1 (CDRM-1044940)

The Macintosh Demo Applications CD Version 1.1 disc

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small update

This blog now has a profile page.

For the first time since its registration three years ago, quiteajolt.com has content.

Also, Interjacent Porphyry has been back in business for a couple of months, but I forgot to make a post announcing it.

Google search suggestions for “messiah”

Google's search suggestions for "messiah," with the third one highlighted: "messiah obama"

Old Mac CDs #1: Apple Chronicle

Starting up a new feature which, in the spirit of this blog, will not even pretend to have a regular update schedule. I’ll be taking a look at some old Macintosh CDs I find lying around, giving you pictures and descriptions of content and all that good stuff. I’m planning on sticking to CDs bundled with Macs or otherwise distributed by Apple, but if I find any other interesting ones, I’ll post ’em up too. We’ll see how much content I can milk out of this.

First up: Apple Chronicle (CDRM-1023150)

Apple Chronicle CD

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The longest word that can’t be expressed as a URL hack

Colin and I were playing Domainr, which is a pretty fun and fantastic site for generating domain hacks. Of course, I already own the best one (wait what), but there’s still a ton of joy in finding out, among other things, that quiteajo.lt is available! (although I’m sure it won’t be five seconds after I hit “Publish”)

Actually, Domainr also produces quite a few things that aren’t technically domain hacks, because a domain hack, by virtue of the first word in the phrase, is a domain name. Domainr searches for top-level domains anywhere in the input string, and if there’s spillover text after the TLD, Domainr will slop the rest of the text over into a first-level directory. For example, in addition to quiteajo.lt, Domainr also produces quitea.jo/lt and qu.it/eajolt. As far as I know, there isn’t a term for this, and I’m not really comfortable with calling it a domain hack, so I’m just going to call it a “URL hack” because the word or phrase forms the whole URL (without the scheme, but I think we can just assume it’s HTTP).

Finding the longest word that can’t be a domain hack is boring: just find the longest word that doesn’t end in a top-level domain. So I’m kind of curious about what’s the longest word that can’t be expressed as a URL hack.

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